How do I get people to understand that this wonderful idea will work?  What does it take to get people to invest in us?
The people involved in this effort are like people throughout the country.  We are not wealthy.  We are frustrated. We face the same challenges of saving our farms, sending our kids to college, putting food on the table, as most people in the US face.  The difference is that instead of waiting for someone else to try and fix things, we have taken the bold step to put ourselves out there and start a new, really exciting venture. 

Is it too good to be true?  I don’t think so.  We all learned how to share toys when we were little, why do we have to forget it?  We learned that helping people was the “good thing” to do. When did that stop being correct?
What makes us different is that instead of looking at hurdles, we look beyond that roadblock to what waits on the other side.  If we see that the other side is a good thing, we begin to look at ways around that barricade.

At NCSC we look at old buildings and instead of seeing graffiti and needy roofs, we see potential coffeeshops, performing arts stages, and solar panels.  We look at these buildings that have stood the test of time and see what they have to teach others.  We look at a building that has served the town well as a school, police station, and senior center and see art gallery, shops, classrooms, puppet theaters and casual meeting spaces.

But this can’t happen if people don’t let themselves see that vision too.  We can’t make it happen if our staff continues to serve as volunteers, our programs aren’t attended, allowing us to meet our contracted payments.
To paraphrase Secretary Clinton, “It takes a region,” to make this happen.  A shared kitchen isn’t necessary for a couple of people, but it is needed if we’re going to facilitate a new food infrastructure, and empower dozens of people to start new businesses.  A community micro-creamery isn’t feasible for one or two farms, but eight farms from 8 different towns, including an ice cream company that’s got a waiting list of buyers, is a great solution.

The government is looking to privatize poultry inspection. They want to make it illegal for farm children to help their parents on the farm. They allow our bees to die off because of corporate greed. Where do people go to find that information and learn how it affects them – that’s us, If people let us.

We need to learn how to judge workmanship, get back our sense of capability, regain our pride in our work,not just in our leisure.  NCSC can support those ideas, but we need people to support those goals.

What do I need to do to channel this frustration?  I keep developing programs, talking about what we’re doing, stretch our reach to other towns, and keep on keeping on,  But, without a paycheck, without personal involvement from others, this dream will struggle and not prosper.

It is an ambitious goal, but it’s based on faith in good people.  If there are people who have a great deal of money to help us, and they are willing to help us, God bless them. We’d love to talk with you.  But I know there are thousands of people in our region, in our areas of interest, who can spare a few dollars to put toward this effort.  The magnification of that donation will be illustrated by finding healthier food, eventually lower taxes, a new friend, a new skill, maybe a new business. That’s how this country was built in the first place.

Be a part of this “movement.” Help us meet our shared goals with NCSC. If you haven’t visited our website at http://www.northcountrysustain.org, please do.  We have a campaign going at Indiegogo.com, called “The NCSC Mosaic,” where you can see all our videos, and they are set up for donations with perks. If you want to speak in person, call the office at 978-252-5021 or email me at Pat@northcountrysustain.org.  This is too good, and has had so many blessings and miracles along the way, to fall now.  It just takes good people investing a little of their resources to build a model for a great resource to share with hundred others, or more.   Please.  Thank you.

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